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October 27, 2011

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Deb

This is really good Eric.

If prophesying can be defined as 'hearing God speak and giving it away', sign me up!

I was feeling like those Zombies you spoke of... it's not a good place to be. Zombies will fight back sometimes though...I know I did, but not for long.

My faith in Jesus was 'rescued' by His words spoken through brothers and sisters who listened, heard and spoke His words of encouragement to me.

We need to learn this.

Brad Jersak

What happened to the woman at the well afterwards? Church tradition did track her Christian journey. According to the Eastern Fathers, here are some fun facts:

"The holy martyr Photina (Svetlana) was that Samaritan woman who had the rare fortune to speak with the Lord Christ Himself at Jacob's Well in Sychar (John. 4). Coming to faith in the Lord, she then came to belief in His Gospel, together with her two sons, Victor and Josiah, and five sisters who were called Anatolia, Phota, Photida, Paraskeva and Kyriake. They went to Carthage in Africa. But they were arrested and taken to Rome in the time of the Emperor Nero, and thrown into prison. By the providence of God, Domnina, Nero's daughter, came into contact with St. Photina and was brought by her to the Christian faith. After imprisonment, they all suffered for Christ. Photina, who first encountered the light of truth by a well, was thrown into a well, where she died and entered into the immortal Kingdom of Christ." (Bishop Nikolaj Velimirovic, The Prolog from Ochrid / Ohridski Prolog)

By the well of Jacob, O holy one, /
thou didst find the Water /
of eternal and blessed life; /
and having partaken /
thereof, O wise Photina, /
thou wentest forth proclaiming Christ, the Anointed One.
(Megalynarion for St. Photina, according to the Byzantine usage.)

cited from http://www.orthodox.net/questions/samaritan_woman_1.html

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